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Autism Spectrum Disorder Archives - EAS

Aba therapy for autism

ABA Therapy for Autism: Understanding the Basics and Expected Outcomes

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Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy has become one of the most widely used and researched approaches for supporting children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). It applies principles of learning theory and behavior management to shape socially significant behaviors. Through positive reinforcement, modeling, prompting, and other techniques, ABA therapists work to increase communication, social, and everyday living skills while reducing challenging behaviors.

Research has demonstrated that ABA can be an effective intervention in improving outcomes for many children with ASD when individualized and delivered at an appropriate intensity. Ultimately, the goals of any ASD therapy should emphasize nurturing individual strengths, autonomy, and dignity to enable children to lead full, meaningful lives within society.

Early Autism services in India

According to the findings of a research study, early childhood implementation of comprehensive and long-term ABA interventions demonstrated a notable and positive impact on various aspects. These include –

  • Language development
  • Intellectual functioning
  • Acquisition of daily living skills, and
  • Social/Group Functional Skills 

In this blog, we will explore the fundamentals of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy for children with autism. Additionally, we will also discuss reasonable outcomes that parents can expect as their child progresses through ABA therapy to lead a more fulfilling life.

Nurturing Growth Through ABA: An Individualized Approach for Children with ASD

At Early Autism Services (EAS), we ground our ABA therapy in the compassionate understanding of each child’s unique needs and strengths. We begin by identifying skills that are challenging for the individual child, then break down the larger skills into manageable components that set the child up for growth. Throughout the therapy, we offer clear instructions, guidance, and plenty of positive praise and reinforcement for achievements, no matter how small. Progress is celebrated!

The ultimate goal is to equip children with tools that foster greater independence and confidence to communicate, learn, and participate more fully in life’s activities. Parents are integral partners in shaping the therapy goals and direction. Maintaining realistic expectations of the pace and outcomes of therapy is important. Our aim is to nurture the incredible talents within each child and help them shine even brighter through sensitivity, encouragement and support. 

Read more about ABA and how it can help your little one.

ABA Therapy | Potential Benefits & Expected Outcomes with Early Autism Services

Autism therapy in bangalore

The potential benefits of ABA therapy for children with autism are profoundly life-enhancing. Through individualized programs, children can make significant strides when it comes to their communication and social skills, self-regulation abilities, and confidence to participate in academics and activities. We are continually awed by the progress made when caring ABA therapists at Early Autism Services (EAS) collaborate with families to nurture each child’s unique growth!

  • Early InterventionResearch shows that early and consistent ABA intervention sets the stage for improved outcomes in the long run. However, it is never too late to start. Our goal is to equip children with tools to navigate daily life more smoothly while recognizing their accomplishments, both great and small. ABA therapy can foster friendship-building, classroom involvement, independent learning and living skills—paving the way for brighter futures.
  • Individualized ABA Therapy – At Early Autism Services, our expert team appreciates and acknowledges what a monumental decision choosing therapy for your child can be – we aim to provide a gold standard of care backed by rigorous training and expertise tailored specifically for your child. Maintaining realistic expectations while celebrating every milestone along the journey with hope and encouragement is our privilege.
  •  Progress Through Support – EAS not only focuses on the immediate goals of therapy but also emphasizes the long-term well-being of children with ASD. By providing comprehensive support and resources, such as regular communication, access to continous data collection strategies, home visits, parent observations, 1:1 attention, multidisciplinary approachEAS equips parents with the tools and knowledge necessary to actively participate in their child’s development. The positive and nurturing environment at EAS fosters a sense of community, making it a trusted partner for families navigating the challenges of autism.

With Early Autism Services, parents can rest assured that their children are in capable hands, receiving the support they need to thrive.

As a leading provider of ABA therapy and occupational therapy, our dynamic team consists of numerous highly skilled behavior therapists, board-certified behavior analysts, and dedicated occupational therapists. Each member shares a passionate commitment to supporting children with autism and their families on their journey toward growth and development.

Small Steps, Big Difference: How EAS Helps Build Independent Futures

How Early Autism Services is different

Early Autism Services’ (EAS) expert team of behavior analysts individualizes ABA therapy to nurture each child’s unique growth. We use a variety of positive reinforcement techniques to motivate children as they develop new skills. It is so rewarding to see children light up with accomplishment when they achieve the goals we structure therapy sessions around!

Moreover, out children-centric programs, goals, and therapy approaches are thoughtfully tailored to suit each child’s needs. Sessions can take place in the home, school, or our center, ensuring consistency across all environments. We find that this level of personalized collaboration between our behavior analysts, parents, and caregivers leads to the best results. 

ABA therapy involves dedication and hard work, but we could not be more amazed by the tremendous strides children as well as parents make one step at a time. Our ultimate hope is for each child to gain confidence in practicing emerging life skills that pave the way to greater independence.

At Early Autism Services, we see it as our privilege to nurture and empower children on the autism spectrum through individualized ABA therapy. By celebrating each accomplishment along the way, we focus on recognizing children’s potential to live a more fulfilling life and assisting them every step of the way!

We would be honored to learn more about your little one’s unique needs and how we can thoughtfully support them on their journey. Our team is ready to partner with you to craft an ABA program tailored specially for them. We encourage you to reach out so we can discuss how our approach guides children steadily forward.

So, get in touch with us today to explore how by working hand-in-hand, we can nurture meaningful growth for your child over time. Let’s get the conversation started; schedule a free consultation call right away with one of our expert clinicians: +91 89291 53820

Effective Speech & Language Therapy for Children with ASD

Effective Speech & Language Therapy for Children with ASD: What to Expect

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Speech and language therapy plays a crucial role in the holistic development of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). It not only enhances overall communication but also improves social skills, enabling better adaptation to society and functioning in day-to-day life. Concerning the importance of early intervention for optimal outcomes, it is highly advisable to initiate therapy targeting speech and overall communication as soon as the diagnosis is made or a deficit is observed.

Speech and language therapy also addresses challenges related to language & communication, offering valuable support to children in improving both verbal and nonverbal aspects of their social communication – in essence, the primary objective of this evidence-based approach is to enhance the child’s ability to communicate in more practical and efficient ways.

Nurturing Voices: A Guide to Effective Speech & Language Therapy for Children with ASD

Speech Therapy ASD

Many children with ASD face challenges in grasping the meaning and rhythm of words and sentences. Additionally, they may also struggle to comprehend body language and the nuances of various vocal tones. Collectively, these difficulties impact the capacity of children with ASD to engage with others, particularly within their own age group.

Tailored Approaches: No two children with ASD are the same, and that’s the beauty of their uniqueness. A good speech therapist, especially those at Early Autism Services, understands this implicitly. Expect a personalized approach that caters to your child’s specific needs and strengths and taps into their individual capabilities. Personalized therapy also ensures that your child’s journey is tailored just for them, which further instills a sense of comfort and security.

Communication Breakthroughs: Therapy focusing on the production of speech and overall increase in communication  is a journey, not a sprint. Celebrate the small victories, whether it’s a new word, a sign, or improved eye contact. Each breakthrough is a testament to your child’s progress, and it is these little triumphs that pave the way for bigger accomplishments! Remember, the path to communication breakthroughs is unique for every child, and progress may unfold in surprising ways. For example, some children might even excel in non-verbal communication, such as gestures or visual aids, showcasing their distinct strengths. Embrace these diverse forms of expression, and trust that every step is a building block toward more significant strides.

Patience and Perseverance: As parents and caregivers of children on the spectrum, you already know and understand that some days may be more challenging than the others. Progress might seem slow, and frustrations can run high. But remember, each child blooms at their own pace. Trust the process, and be patient. It’s in these moments of perseverance that you’ll witness the resilience of your child and the power of effective therapy.

Embracing Technology: In a rapidly developing digital age, technology has become an invaluable tool in therapy. Interactive apps and games can make learning enjoyable and engaging for your child. These tech-savvy resources can offer diverse activities, from language development exercises to social interaction simulations, ensuring a well-rounded and dynamic approach to your child’s growth. Additionally, aim to stay involved in your child’s screen time, using it as an opportunity for bonding and shared exploration. Also, make the most of these tools and create an environment where learning is not just educational but a fun experience, too!

Family involvement in children with autism

Family Involvement: Your participation and contribution is crucial. An adept therapist (trained in Verbal Behaviour and/or Speech Therapy) will not only work with your child but will also guide you on how to support their development at home. Incorporate those therapy techniques into your daily routine, and watch how ordinary moments turn into opportunities for growth. As you actively participate in your child’s therapy, remember that your love and encouragement are powerful catalysts, creating a nurturing environment where they feel supported, valued, and inspired to continue developing their communication skills.

In Closing –

At Early Autism Services (EAS), we have had the privilege of witnessing countless success stories where children, once presumed to be non-verbal, have found their voices through effective use of therapy focusing on increasing overall communication including speech. It’s stories like these that fuel our passion for what we do, and we’re confident that you, too, will experience the joy of your child’s developing communication skills.

So, get in touch with our autism care experts now or schedule a free consultation call at +91 8929153820. This way, we will be better equipped to address all your needs!

Advantages of Sensory Play Early Autism Services

Advantages of Sensory Play: Fun Activities for Children with ASD

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Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often perceive and interact with the world around them differently. Sensory play, a hands-on activity that stimulates the senses, can be an invaluable tool for parents and caregivers. Through sensory play, children can also express themselves freely. This can be especially beneficial for non-verbal children, allowing them to convey emotions and preferences effectively.

Play-centered activities also play an important role in shifting their focus from unwanted behaviors to more constructive, non-injurious forms of expression, employing toys or preferred activities as their chosen means of communication. Besides, not only is play therapy enjoyable, but it also offers a wide range of benefits for your little one!

So, let’s take a look at the key advantages of sensory play for children on the autism spectrum –

Enhanced Communication

Sensory play can encourage non-vocal erbal communication. Whether it’s using gestures, facial expressions, or sounds to express their feelings during play, it plays a pivotal role in fostering communication development and interpersonal skills. Aligning with this, group sensory play can promote social interaction. Encouraging playdates or group sessions can help children with ASD learn to share, take turns, and engage with others.

Sensory Regulation

Children with ASD can struggle with sensory regulation, either seeking sensory stimulation or avoiding it. Sensory play, in this regard, provides a safe environment for them to explore and self-regulate their sensory needs.

Improved Fine Motor Skills

Improved Fine Motor Skills Early Autism Services

Many sensory activities involve manipulating objects, which helps improve fine motor skills. This, in turn, can help children develop daily skills such as writing, buttoning clothes, and eating independently. Likewise, sensory play also stimulates cognitive growth; sorting, categorizing, and problem-solving during activities like sand or water play can further enhance cognitive abilities.

Stress Reduction

Sensory play is known for its calming effect. Activities like using stress balls or sensory bins filled with soothing materials can help reduce anxiety and meltdowns. This approach also helps in sensory integration, enabling children to process and respond to sensory information more effectively.

As seen above, engaging in sensory play activities can be both enjoyable and therapeutic for children on the autism spectrum. So, read on for some fun sensory play ideas for your little one:

 Sensory Bins

Create themed sensory bins with items like rice, beans, sand, or water beads. You can also add small toys or objects for kids to explore and manipulate. These tactile experiences can help improve fine motor skills and provide a calming sensory input.

Texture Boards

Make texture boards featuring various materials like fur, fabric, sandpaper, and more. Children can touch and feel these textures for a tactile experience. You can also encourage them to describe the textures, which will further aid in building sensory awareness and language development.

Sensory Bottles

Fill clear plastic bottles with glitter, colored water, or small objects. Seal them tightly, and children can shake and observe the sensory effects. In addition to offering visual stimulation, sensory bottles can also serve as a portable calming tool during moments of stress or anxiety.

Playdough Play

Playdough for children Early Autism

Homemade or store-bought playdough offers endless opportunities for molding, squishing, and shaping. Through playdough, children can engage in imaginative play, build hand strength, and explore color and texture.

Messy Play

Engage in controlled messy play with activities like finger painting, shaving cream art, or mud play. These activities encourage self-expression and sensory exploration and can also be a source of joy while keeping the mess manageable. However, remember to use washable, non-toxic materials!

Sensory Walks

Set up sensory paths or walkways with different textures like foam, sandpaper, or grass for kids to explore with their feet. These paths promote physical activity and sensory integration, improving balance and coordination.

Aromatherapy Play

Introduce scents through scented playdough and essential oils to engage the sense of smell. Aromatherapy can also help children relax, focus, or uplift their mood, depending on the scents used. For example, while lavender can provide a soothing and relaxing environment, chocolate and vanilla aromas can be great for insomnia and irritability.

Sensory Stories

Create sensory stories by combining tactile elements with storytelling to enhance the narrative experience. This approach encourages language development, imagination, and sensory awareness, as well.

Balloon Play

Balloon Play for Children with Autism

Inflated balloons offer a variety of sensory experiences, including touch, sound and visual stimulation. Balloon play can be both exciting and a valuable tool for tactile and visual sensory exploration for children on the autism spectrum.

While these play ideas can be super beneficial, you can also customize sensory activities based on your child’s sensory preferences. 

For example, if they seek proprioceptive input, consider activities like swinging or jumping on a trampoline. For those who are tactile defensive, opt for less tactilely stimulating activities, such as creating patterns on the ground using wet brushes or squeeze bottles filled with water.

Remember that each child with ASD is unique, so always observe their reactions and adjust activities accordingly. Sensory play isn’t just about fun; it’s a valuable tool for promoting growth, communication, and well-being in children with ASD. By incorporating these activities into your little one’s daily routine, you can make a significant difference in their development and quality of life!

With our comprehensive and personalized autism care services, your child can make the most of the individualized attention and evidence-based therapies we provide. So, choose Early Autism Services (EAS) to be your child’s special needs care provider, and let’s build a brighter future for your child together.

Contact us at +91 8929153820 to speak with a clinician today!

Autism for women children

Understanding the Unique Needs of Girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

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As a parent or caregiver of a child with autism, you play a valuable role in supporting and nurturing their development. And when it comes to caring for girls with ASD, it’s of utmost importance to recognize and address their unique needs. Autism, a neurodevelopmental disorder, affects children regardless of gender; however, it is essential to understand that girls on the spectrum often face distinctive challenges compared to boys and require special attention.

Research indicates that girls with ASD may be underdiagnosed since their behaviors differ from those of boys on the spectrum. For example, boys are more likely to have limited and repetitive areas of play, whereas girls are relatively less repetitive, with broader play areas. Since their behavior varies in terms of social interactions and communication styles, it is imperative to personalize support strategies that cater to their needs.

Although no two children with ASD are exactly alike, understanding the patterns and tendencies commonly seen in girls can provide crucial insights for parents and caregivers alike. Moreover, by effectively identifying these aspects and incorporating practical tips to enhance their overall quality of life, you can do your best to create a suitable environment that fosters growth, understanding, and empowerment!

So, let’s dive in and take a closer look at the unique challenges & needs of girls on the autism spectrum –

Establishing Boundaries and Promoting Safety

Teaching girls with autism about personal boundaries and safety is vital. Due to difficulties associated with communication, they may require explicit and elaborate guidance to navigate appropriate interactions with others. Accordingly, setting clear rules and providing visual support can help establish healthy boundaries and, in turn, ensure their safety.

Children with ASD, especially girls, may have difficulty recognizing potentially dangerous situations and understanding social cues related to personal safety. Hence, empowering them to establish healthy boundaries can help them navigate social situations more effectively, thereby promoting positive social interactions and reducing the likelihood of misunderstandings or conflicts.

Understanding how to set healthy boundaries also allows girls on the autism spectrum to develop a sense of autonomy and independence. As they continue to gain a deeper understanding of establishing appropriate limits and expectations, they can make more informed decisions in the long run and subsequently reduce anxiety, discomfort, and uncertainty across diverse settings.

Preparing for Menstruation: Period Care, Support, and Guidance

Menstruation is a significant milestone in a girl’s life, and children with autism may require additional support

Menstruation is a significant milestone in a girl’s life, and children with autism may require additional support during this transition. Puberty can also be an especially challenging time for them as they struggle to understand and cope with their emotions and hormonal changes. Besides, when girls on the spectrum begin menstruating, they may also experience sensory issues; however, this often goes unnoticed because talking about periods is still considered taboo in several societies. In fact, girls with ASD have almost three times the risk of coercive sexual victimization than the average person, as per a 2018 study that explored the link between neurodiversity and coercion.

Managing periods can also be tough due to sensory sensitivities caused by period products, physical discomfort, nausea, and hormones that worsen existing sensory difficulties. As a result, it is crucial to acknowledge these challenges and provide the required support during this time of the month. Educating girls about menstruation, using visual aids, and providing a predictable routine can also help alleviate anxiety and ensure they have the necessary knowledge and resources for proper self-care.

Embracing Individuality and Special Interests

Girls on the autism spectrum often have passionate interests that are seen as more socially acceptable compared to the typical ‘special interests’ associated with boys. For example, they may be deeply interested in animals or reading, challenging the stereotype that individuals with ASD are mainly drawn to things like trains. Although girls on the spectrum may spend a lot of time drawing or reading, these interests may not be seen as ‘special’ or ‘atypical’ because they align with common hobbies, thus leading to late or even underdiagnosis.

Furthermore, it’s essential to understand that girls with autism may also put a lot of effort into trying to fit in with their non-autistic peers. They are more likely to study social behaviors, people, and norms to blend in, which can become a special interest in itself. As a result, it is important for parents and caregivers to embrace their individuality and incorporate their unique interests into therapy and learning activities. Adopting this approach can play a remarkable role in enhancing engagement, fostering self-expression, and building their confidence.

Cultivating Independence and Life Skills

Cultivating independence and life skills empowers girls with autism to lead fulfilling lives

Cultivating independence and life skills empowers girls with autism to lead fulfilling lives. Providing them with a platform to practice communication and social interaction in meaningful contexts not only helps develop essential daily living skills but also promotes autonomy and self-confidence. Aligning with this, aspects such as problem-solving, following instructions, requesting help, and engaging in conversations, contribute to their ability to effectively communicate and interact with others in various environments, including school, work, and the community.

Additionally, some of the key life skills that help advocate independence in girls on the autism spectrum include personal hygiene, dressing skills, meal preparation and nutrition, time management and organization, as well as money management. It is important to approach life skills training for girls with ASD in a structured, individualized manner, taking into account their unique strengths, challenges, and interests. And if you require more help with that, our team of experts at Early Autism Services (EAS) is here to assist you!

Collaborative Support – Caregivers, Educators, and Autism Care Experts

During the ages of 7 to 8, girls tend to be more socially advanced than boys of the same age. They may also have progressive communication skills, be more cooperative with instructions, and can negotiate and work together with peers effectively. However, this factor can likely lead to ASD-related traits (especially in terms of communication and social interactions) being overlooked and underdiagnosed in girls.

It further highlights the need for effective collaboration between children, caregivers, educators, and autism care experts in providing the right diagnosis and comprehensive support. Here, maintaining open lines of communication and working together to create individualized plans can greatly ensure that girls with autism receive the best possible care and opportunities.

Concluding Reflections 

As you embark on this journey with your daughter, it’s important to adopt a personalized approach that truly suits her unique strengths and challenges.

In essence, here’s how you can help address the unique and special needs of girls on the autism spectrum:

  •         Establishing Boundaries and Promoting Safety
  •         Preparing for Menstruation: Period Care, Support, and Guidance
  •         Embracing Individuality and Special Interests
  •         Cultivating Independence and Life Skills
  •         Collaborative Support – Caregivers, Educators, and Autism Care Experts

And if you’re questioning how to go about these in the right way, your search ends here!

By choosing the right resources, such as the expert assistance we provide at Early Autism Services (EAS), and cultivating a strong support system, you’ll certainly be equipped with the necessary tools and strategies needed to offer the best possible care for your daughter.

Through an inclusive and nurturing environment, we believe that we can make a profound difference in their lives.

So, connect with us now by scheduling a free consultation here. We’re eager to listen, understand, and collaborate with you in crafting a personalized approach that will empower your daughter to thrive! 

Helpful Tips for Teaching Self-Care Skills to Children with Autism

Helpful Tips for Teaching Self-Care Skills to Children with Autism

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Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental condition that affects communication, social interaction, and behavior. Children with autism often face challenges associated with carrying out daily activities and also struggle with self-care skills such as bathing, dressing, and handling money.

An important facet of autism care, especially in children, is receiving proper guidance about self-care, hygiene, and safety. Moreover, it is also possible to build up your child’s self-esteem by helping them focus on self-care skills such as grooming and self-hygiene!

Teaching self-care skills is essential for the well-being of children diagnosed with autism; however, it can be difficult since the needs of every child are unique, and a one-size-fits-all approach may not work for every kid. Hence, as a caregiver, parent, or teacher of a child with ASD, it is important to know how to nurture these skills effectively and in a way that is tailored to their individual requirements.

And this blog, we will provide helpful tips and strategies for teaching self-care skills to children with autism, with the core objectives of promoting their independence and helping them feel less afraid and anxious in social settings.

So, let’s take a look at some of these tips 

Begin with the basics

When teaching self-care skills to children with ASD, it is important to start with basic skills such as washing hands, brushing teeth, and getting dressed. In addition to adding value to their daily lives, these skills can also help build a stronger foundation for learning more complex skills as they grow older.

Break down tasks into smaller steps

Aba therapy by breaking it down

Children with autism may find it difficult to understand multi-step instructions. Here, breaking down a task into smaller steps makes it easier for them to understand and follow. For example, instead of telling your child to brush their teeth, compartmentalize it into smaller, individual steps such as picking up the toothbrush, applying toothpaste, brushing their teeth, rinsing, and putting the toothbrush back in place.

Implement visual aids

Autism children with flash cards for teaching ABA therapy

Visual aids such as picture cards, schedules, and videos can be helpful in teaching self-care skills to children. Moreover, visual aids provide a pictorial representation of what is expected of them and help them understand the task better. For instance, you can use visual aids to show the steps involved in a particular skill set and, subsequently, provide a pictorial schedule to help them understand what they need to do next.

Use social stories

Social stories are characterized as short, descriptive stories that help children with ASD understand a particular situation or task. You can also use social stories to explain why self-care skills are essential and how to perform them. For example, a social story about keeping your hands clean could explain why it’s important to wash your hands, how to do it correctly, and the benefits of doing it regularly.

Practice positive reinforcement

Positive reinforcement is a powerful tool that helps teach self-care skills effectively. Additionally, praising your child for completing a task or rewarding them with their favorite toy for making progress can help motivate them to work on their self-care skills, and even encourage them to continue practicing the desired behavior.

Practice regularly

Tips to help children with ASD

Practicing self-care skills regularly is crucial to help children with autism become more independent. Also, it is important to note that regular practice helps build muscle memory and makes the skill more comfortable to perform. So, encourage them to practice those skills daily, even if they don’t need to use them at the moment, since it can make a significant difference in terms of their progress.

Remember, patience is key

Teaching self-care skills to children with ASD can take time and patience. Besides, it is also essential to give them time to understand and practice the skills on a regular basis. Here, it helps a great deal when you are patient with their progress and do not get discouraged if and when they struggle to learn. Make sure you celebrate their successes and milestones, no matter how small, and keep working with them to develop their self-care skills!

Teaching self-care skills to children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder requires a patient, individualized approach. As demonstrated, the above-mentioned tips can be highly effective in helping children learn self-care skills and become more independent. In fact, the more you work with your little one on these activities, the easier it will be for them to learn new skill sets as they grow up.

Training your child to be self-sufficient is a gradual process. Encouraging them in this regard will not only help reduce their stress levels but also promote their self-confidence and individuality. These skills can also play an essential role in facilitating family relationships while giving your child a sense of belonging.

And in summary, let’s revisit these 7 helpful tips for teaching self-care skills to children with ASD:

  •         Begin with the basics
  •         Break down tasks into smaller steps
  •         Implement visual aids
  •         Use social stories
  •         Practice positive reinforcement
  •         Practice regularly
  •         Remember, patience is key

No two children with autism are alike; this is exactly why Early Autism Services (EAS) strives to present your child with the right assistance, tailored to their specific needs. Additionally, our experienced team is here to help with any questions you may have.

So, make sure you get in touch with us right away and choose the best autism care services for your little one!

How Effective are Evidence-Based Practices for Autism Spectrum Disorder?

How Effective are Evidence-Based Practices for Autism Spectrum Disorder?

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Children with autism spectrum disorder – or even a suspected diagnosis – can significantly benefit from early intervention by virtue of evidence-based practices (EBPs). According to The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorder, ‘An evidence-based practice is an instructional/intervention procedure or set of procedures for which researchers have provided an acceptable level of research that shows the practice produces positive outcomes for children, youth, and/or adults with ASD.’

Moreover, recent research by the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, in association with the National Professional Development Center on ASD, identified 27 evidence-based practices. These interventions were found to be effective for children, supported via exhaustive scientific research and analysis. In our previous blog, we discussed the top seven evidence-based treatments effective for ASD as well as the integral role of ABA in autism treatment.

And now, let’s take a closer look at the next 20 evidence-based practices with demonstrated efficacy in the field of ASD therapy and treatment –

Visual Supports – Visual supports target numerous adaptive behavior skills, such as task engagement, transitions across activities, independent performance, and enhanced response chain length. Visual supports have also proven effective in augmenting skills across areas, like social initiation, the demonstration of play skills, and social interaction skills.

Time Delay – Time delay, effective for pre-schoolers to young adults (19-22 years) with ASD, can be used effectively to address communication, behavior, social, joint attention, play, school-readiness, cognitive, academic, adaptive, and motor skills.

Task Analysis – Task analysis (TA) entails breaking a chained or complex behavioral ability into smaller components to inculcate a skill. As per evidence-based studies, this intervention can be used to address social, joint attention, self-help, motor, communication, and academic skills.

Structured Play Groups – Structured play groups (SPG) are interventions that include small groups to teach a broad range of outcomes. This intervention is effective for elementary school-age learners between 6-11 years with autism.

Social Narratives – Social narratives are aimed at helping learners adjust to routine changes and adapt based on social as well as physical cues. Moreover, this EBP can also be used to teach specific social behaviors and skill sets.

Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) – Primarily used to teach learners to communicate in a social context, during PECS, learners are initially taught to give a picture of a desired item to a communicative partner in exchange for the item.

Video Modeling – Video modeling (VM) is a method of instruction that utilizes display equipment and video recording in order to offer a visual model of the targeted skill or behavior.

Self-Management – As an intervention package that teaches children to independently regulate their behavior, self-management helps teach children to discriminate between inappropriate as well as appropriate behaviors. It also helps learners accurately record and monitor their own behaviors and reinforce themselves for behaving in a suitable manner.

Reinforcement – Mainly utilized to teach new skills while enhancing behavior, reinforcement helps establish the relationship between the learner’s behavior or use of skill as well as the consequence of the same.

Social Skills Training – The majority of social skills training intervention meetings include role-playing or practice, instruction on basic concepts, and feedback. This approach helps learners acquire as well as practice communication and social skills, thereby encouraging positive interactions with peers

Prompting – Prompting procedures include verbal, physical, or gestural assistance provided to children in order to help them acquire or engage in a targeted behavior or skill.

 Scripting – Scripting (SC) involves the presentation of a written and/or verbal description of a particular situation, serving as a model for the child. The primary basis of SC is to help learners on the autism spectrum anticipate what may occur during a given activity, thus improving their ability to participate in the same.

 Parent-Implemented Intervention – Parent-implemented intervention (PII) involves programs in which parents are tasked with carrying out some (or all) of the interventions with their child. In this approach, parents are trained by professionals to teach new skills in group formats or one-on-one in a community or home setting.

 Differential Reinforcement – Differential reinforcement of alternative, incompatible, or other behavior (DRA/I/O) aims to teach new skills. This approach helps lessen the incidence of undesirable behavior, such as tantrums, self-injury, stereotypic behavior, and aggression. 

 Naturalistic Intervention – Naturalistic intervention (NI) is a collection of practices based on applied behavior analysis (ABA) principles. These practices are designed to encourage specific target behaviors based on the child’s core interests by establishing more complex skills that are not only appropriate to the interaction but also naturally reinforcing.

 Modeling – Often combined with other strategies like reinforcement and prompting, modeling includes the demonstration of a desired target behavior, resulting in imitation and subsequent acquisition of the imitated behavior.

 Extinction – Extinction (EXT), a strategy based on applied behavior analysis (ABA), is used to reduce or eliminate challenging behavior. This intervention has been effective for pre-schoolers (3-5 years) to high school-age learners (15-18 years) on the autism spectrum.

 Exercise – Exercise (ECE) is a strategy that includes a rise in physical exertion as a means of increasing appropriate behavior or minimizing problem behaviors. This approach also helps improve physical fitness as well as motor skills.

 Discrete Trial Teaching – Discrete trial teaching (DTT) is characterized as a one-to-one instructional approach used to teach skills in a controlled, planned, as well as systematic manner.

 Functional Communication Training – Functional communication training (FCT) is a systematic practice that aims to replace subtle communicative acts or inappropriate behavior with more appropriate as well as effective communication skills and behaviors.

With the autism spectrum being so incredibly diverse, there is an ever-growing need for efficient treatment methods. And in this regard, intervention science continues to play a pivotal role in offering evidence that ascertains whether therapies and practices are effective in providing the best possible results.

And at Early Autism Services (EAS), our board-certified behavior analysts are thoroughly trained in applying evidence-based treatments for autism, evaluating treatment strategies, and effectively conducting behavioral assessments. So, if you’re ready to provide your little one with the best autism care in Bengaluru, contact us right away by requesting a free consultation.

 

Evidence-Based Practices & Treatments for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Evidence-Based Practices & Treatments for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

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Over the years, extensive research has indicated that individuals, as well as children diagnosed with ASD, benefit from early and appropriate interventions throughout the course of their lives. In this regard, children on the autism spectrum reap significant advantages through treatments that incorporate evidence-based approaches predominantly for targeting developmental skills. As parents and caregivers consider treatment methods for autism spectrum disorder, it is essential to recognize approaches that have proven or demonstrated efficacy.

So, what exactly are evidence-based practices and treatments for autism?

What is evidence bases practices in treating autism

Evidence-based practices (EBPs) are well-researched interventions that are shown to be safe as well as effective via scientific investigation. According to the National Professional Development Center on ASD, efficacy must be established through peer-reviewed research in scientific journals by virtue of accepted high-standard methodologies. Evidence-based practices or treatments for ASD are established on objective scientific evidence, including the demonstration of measurable results and thorough investigative studies. Here, research plays an integral role in terms of determining whether a treatment is actually effective and, in turn, enabling applied behavioral analysts to design and implement suitable strategies for treatment based on scientific research.

In contrast, non-evidence-based therapies or treatments have not been subjected to former scientific research and inquiry, and have no proof or solid foundation for their effectiveness.

For many parents of children on the autism spectrum, evidence-based therapies’ scientific validation can also grant an added sense of assurance and peace of mind regarding the high likelihood of favorable or positive outcomes.

Evidence-Based Practices for Children with Autism

27 evidence-based practices were identified by the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute in association with the National Professional Development Center on ASD.

Given below is an incredibly useful list for those willing to know more about scientifically-researched interventions with the highest rates of effectiveness. And for your reference, we have highlighted some of the most commonly used evidence-based autism therapies in order to help you make the right choice –

Cognitive Behavioral Intervention (CBI)

This evidenced-based practice is grounded on the belief that behavior is facilitated by cognitive processes. These interventions are mainly used with children displaying problematic behavior related to specific emotions or feelings, such as anger or anxiety. CBI helps address social, communication, behavior, and cognitive health outcomes, predominantly for elementary school-age learners (6-11 years) to high school-age learners (15-18 years) with autism.

Technology-Aided Instruction and Intervention

Technology, as the central feature of this intervention approach, is used intentionally to increase/maintain and improve daily living, work, productivity, recreation, and leisure capabilities of children with autism spectrum disorder. According to evidence-based studies, this intervention has been effective for pre-schoolers (3-5 years) to young adults (19-22 years) diagnosed with autism.

Antecedent-Based Interventions (ABI)

Antecedent-based interventions (ABI) entail various modifications made to the environment in an attempt to shape or change a child’s behavior. Some of the most common ABI procedures include enriching the environment in order to offer additional cues or access to more materials and incorporating the child’s choice in educational activities or materials. As per evidence-based studies, this intervention method has been effective for toddlers (0-2 years) to young adults (19-22 years) on the autism spectrum.

Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA)

This evidence-based practice is generally used to identify the causes of interfering behaviors: aggression towards others, self-injury, or destructive behaviors. It is typically followed by the creation as well as the implementation of a behavior package in order to address the interfering conduct described.

Peer-Mediated Instruction and Intervention

Peer-mediated instruction and intervention (PMII) is used to teach typically developing peers methods to interact with as well as help learners on the autism spectrum acquire new behavior and communication skills by increasing social opportunities within natural environments. With PMII, peers are methodically taught ways of engaging children with autism in social interactions in both learner-initiated as well as teacher-directed activities.

Response Interruption/Redirection

Response interruption/redirection includes the introduction of a comment, prompt, or other distractors when an interfering behavior occurs. These prompts are designed to divert the attention of the child away from the intrusive behavior and subsequently, lead to its reduction.

Pivotal Response Training

Pivotal response training (PRT) is a naturalistic intervention based on the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA). Building on learner initiative as well as interests, PRT is particularly effective for the development of communication, play, language, and social behaviors for toddlers (0-2 years) to middle school-age learners (12-14 years) on the autism spectrum.

To summarise, some of the most commonly used evidence-based autism therapies 

  • Cognitive Behavioral Intervention (CBI)
  • Technology-Aided Instruction and Intervention
  • Antecedent-Based Interventions (ABI)
  • Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA)
  • Peer-Mediated Instruction and Intervention
  • Response Interruption/Redirection
  • Pivotal Response Training

The Integral Role of ABA in Autism Treatment 

As other potential and developing practices continue to be analyzed in empirical studies, some of them will undoubtedly be identified as evidence-based. In this regard, several EBPs draw directly from the science of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), which at its core, is used to enhance an individual’s quality of life.

According to Autism Speaks, more than 20 studies have demonstrated that long-term and intensive therapy using ABA principles plays a significant role in improving outcomes for several children with autism. The research finds key improvements in areas such as language development, social and intellectual functioning, as well as other skill sets integral to daily life.

High quality ABA programs, such as those offered by Early Autism Services (EAS), prioritize the values and individual goals of the child. Moreover, it also focuses on meaningful skill development and close collaborations with the little ones as well as their families. At Early Autism Services (EAS), our board-certified behavior analysts are proficient in implementing evidence-based treatments for autism, evaluating treatment strategies, and effectively conducting behavioral assessments. So, if you’re ready to provide your little one with the best autism care in Bengaluru, contact us right away by requesting a free consultation

Learning styles of children suffering from Autism Spectrum Disorder

Learning Styles of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

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Learning styles is characterized as a concept that describes the method through which individuals acquire information about their surroundings and environment. The main types of learning styles include auditory learning – listening to a live or pre-recorded lecture; visual learning – reading a textbook or picture book; and kinesthetic or hands-on’ learning pressing buttons on a remote to understand how the device operates.  

While every person has a unique style of learning, this factor plays an important role in influencing how they perform in an educational setting. However, since children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have non-conforming educational and intellectual profiles, it is challenging for teachers, as well as parents or caregivers, to curate a curriculum that aligns with their abilities and to develop successful academic opportunities. As a result, the increasing incidence of autism diagnosis calls for building an improved understanding of students’ unique profiles and planning syllabi that are mindfully created by thoughtful consideration of learning styles and preferences.

Which Learning Style Does My Child Prefer?

As children on the autism spectrum primarily rely on one style of learning, it is important that you closely observe your little one’s predominant learning preference. For example, if your child mostly prefers to play with building blocks, push buttons and shapes to produce sounds or lights, open and close closets or drawers, and is constantly taking toys apart and placing them back together, these factors may indicate that he or she is a ‘hands-on’ or kinesthetic learner. On the other hand, if your child mainly learns by looking at picture books, watching TV (without or with sound), and carefully observing their surroundings, your little one is most likely a visual learner. Likewise, your child is mostly an auditory learner if he or she prefers listening to music and engaging in auditory stimulus more than consuming visually-interactive content and absorbing information by actively talking and interacting with those around them.

Let’s learn more about identifying the common learning styles of children with autism –

Visual

Visuals are appealing to children as it presents a complete picture in just a glance. Moreover, visual aids such as diagrams, flashcards, picture books, etc., can also be utilized as the beginning point for introducing the child to more challenging concepts in subjects like mathematics and science. This method of learning can help students better grasp abstract concepts, including complex feelings and emotions, as well.

Kinesthetic

Kinesthetic children learn best by touching and acquiring a tactile, hands-on experience. These learners tend to enjoy activities such as crafts, painting, playing with building blocks, and even taking toys apart so they can ultimately figure out how to put them back together again. Since hands-on learners learn best by practically engaging in an activity, they may often be observed going around the house or classroom to discover and explore things and objects with their hands.

Auditory

For students who mainly rely on their auditory abilities to grasp information, parents and teachers may observe that while these children may not always make a lot of eye contact, they are actively paying attention to what’s being said and will answer when asked a question or spoken to. Auditory learners are more inclined towards hearing information elucidated verbally and, in fact, learn better via listening and participating in conversations. Furthermore, they may also display an ardent interest in reading aloud, learning new languages, and listening to music.

Keeping these styles of learning in mind, it is also essential to note that students with ASD feel increasingly more comfortable in their general learning environment when their unique physiological, sociological, psychological, and environmental needs are adequately met. Accordingly, parents and teachers alike must develop an aptitude for carefully analyzing different ability profiles to create learning spaces that are more enriching, encouraging, and welcoming for children on the autism spectrum. These steps would not only help generate more successful academic experiences but also boost the child’s enthusiasm toward learning and intellectual development.  

Effectively Supporting Your Child’s Learning Style

Support your child's learning style if they have autism spectrum disorder

When parents, as well as teachers, recognize that every student possesses a unique set of needs and preferred learning styles, they are more equipped to develop a learning environment that is conducive to success. Researchers focused on exploring different learning styles have also found that high-risk students benefit most from instruction tailored and personalized according to their preferred learning style.

Therefore, it is important that teachers and parents identify the child’s preferred mode of learning as soon as they enter the school system or a home-based learning environment and establish efforts to adapt their methods based on the student’s strengths and abilities. This will certainly ensure that the child has the greatest chance for academic success!

You can also explore real-world experiences that augment your child’s learning and understanding. For example, if your child is highly interested in and passionate about wildlife, or animals in general, a great idea is to visit a petting zoo or an animal shelter. Through this, the child will gain a more holistic view and will also be able to develop a wider understanding of the world. In addition to helping your child retain more information, such experiences present your little one with meaningful insights in a way that sufficiently meets their individual learning style.

Remember that parents and teachers have a significant influence on children. And in this regard, early childhood therapies and programs, such as those offered by Early Autism Services (EAS), are uniquely optimized in a manner that supports and caters to your child’s strengths and requirements. For more information on this, feel free to get in touch with us by requesting a free consultation or speaking with our expert clinician (+91 8929153820) today!­­­­

Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Common Challenges of Parenting a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

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Parents of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are nothing short of superheroes!

In addition to being the child’s support system, they also maneuver through the challenges that come with ensuring that their little one receives all the opportunities and prospects that a typically growing child would.

Apart from the difficulties associated with social communication, children with autism tend to have restricted interests and display repetitive mannerisms. However, it can be problematic or even embarrassing for parents when their child demonstrates unusual behaviors, especially in a public setting. These may include spinning around, showing extreme displays of affection (or the opposite), flapping of hands, invading others’ personal space, and inappropriate touching.

Children with Autism

In this case, frustration and anger are some of the most common emotions experienced by parents. These feelings may also emerge when others fail to understand how or to what degree ASD impacts a child – leading to outsiders judging both the parent and the child unfairly. Guilty feelings can also arise when parents wrongly blame themselves for their child’s condition or when they feel that they are not doing enough for their little one.

How Can Parents Overcome These Challenges?

During such times, patiently teaching your child about inappropriate behaviors while showing them what a better, much healthier reaction looks like can help a great deal. Here, discovering the medium of communication that appeals to your child the most, including videos, photos, or even taping and viewing step-by-step instructions to reinforce the message consistently until new behavior patterns are formed, is also a great solution.

You can also carry a bunch of stress relievers or your kid’s favorite toys whenever in a public setting. This can help distract them and divert their attention from a stressful, overwhelming stimulus or major sensory overload. It is also advisable that parents, as well as caregivers, ignore the stares of onlookers and calmly focus only on the child and his or her needs. Although disregarding strangers’ constant eyes on you and choosing to remain calm sounds rather difficult, this approach can greatly help reduce the stress experienced by the child and the parent.

Raising Children with Autism Bangalore

Some families also experience the strain of long-term expenses when it comes to raising a child on the autism spectrum. For example, parents may have to use personal vehicles instead of public transportation for commuting with their child or even hire a full- or part-time caregiver, which increases the overall financial burden. On the other hand, nuclear families and single parents may feel the added stress of taking care of their child on their own without any assistance or support from their extended family members. Consequently, without the support of caregivers or relatives, parents may also find it highly challenging to juggle responsibilities at home, the workplace, and taking care of the child. While this leaves parents with little to no time for their own needs, it could also lead to limited opportunities for socializing with others, indulging in interests and hobbies, or even receiving adequate rest.

Moreover, bringing up a child with autism can be challenging, especially when others do not understand the problems and instead resort to stigmatizing the condition altogether. Here, an effective way to break the stigma surrounding autism spectrum disorder is to raise awareness about the condition. In order to achieve this, open discussions and conversations associated with ASD must always be encouraged. When relatives and friends begin talking about autism and acknowledging its impact on parents and families alike, the chances of misunderstanding and unwarranted judgments are significantly reduced. Besides, your loved ones would also have the opportunity to understand how to support you on a deeper and more practical level!

What’s My Next Best Step?

Parenting a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can indeed be stressful, and taking care of a child with special needs requires a unique set of skills built over time. However, it is important to remember that a surge of negative emotions when overwhelmed is absolutely normal, and in case the stress of parenting becomes a bit too much to deal with, speaking to a professional can prove to be highly advantageous.

If parents feel that they are unable to cope with their child’s special needs, they even risk putting their own health in danger. Hence, it is essential that parents address their own needs, while also catering to their child’s needs – in this way, you will definitely be able to help and be there for your kid a lot more. Moreover, talking openly with relatives, as well as friends, can play an integral role in helping others empathize and understand your child’s condition better. It may also encourage them to provide added support and appreciate what your child can do instead of focusing on their shortcomings.

According to experts, parent-mediated intervention, especially during preschool years, can significantly enhance the life skills of children with ASD and also heighten their chances of leading an improved quality of life. And for the best results, make sure you choose India’s finest autism service provider for your child by partnering with Early Autism Services (EAS)!

Contact us now and request a free consultation here.

Effective Strategies to Deal with Your child meltdowns

Effective Strategies to Manage Your Child During Meltdowns

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Children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder may get overstimulated or overwhelmed by situations that are beyond their control. Since parents, teachers, or caregivers, may not always know the underlying cause of their distress, it is important to have a set of strategies at hand in order to help children relax, calm down, and refocus.

But before diving deeper into some of the most effective strategies to reorient the child during meltdowns, it is important to understand what a ‘meltdown’ actually is. According to the National Autistic Society, meltdowns occur when an individual becomes overwhelmed by their present situation while temporarily losing control of their behavior. This loss of control may be expressed physically (biting, kicking), vocally (crying and screaming), or both.

Meltdowns are considered similar to the body’s fight response. When a child with autism suffers from a meltdown, they often experience higher levels of discomfort and anxiety, often construed as an aggressive panic attack, a ‘tantrum,’ or frustration. Tantrums can happen in any given situation, especially if a child is hungry, irritable, and tired. However, a meltdown of a child on the spectrum is caused by the inability of the child to handle a situation due to extreme overload.

As per Myles and Southwick (1999), tantrums, meltdowns, and rage usually occur in three stages of variable lengths. These are

Rumbling Stage

Rumbling Stage of Autism Spectrum Disorder

The rumbling stage is regarded as the first stage of a meltdown, during which children may exhibit particular behavior changes not distinctly related to a full-blown meltdown. These include tensed muscles, nail-biting, or even repetitive movements, such as shaking a leg or rocking back and forth. Although these apparently minor behaviors are often ignored or remain unnoticed, they can play a crucial role in pointing to an imminent meltdown. These may also be called ‘precursor behaviors’ Additionally, in a more serious situation, the child may also engage in verbal or physical threats.

Rage Stage

Autistic Child Yelling - Tips to manage autistic childrenIf indicative behaviors are not diffused during the initial phase, the child may progress to the rage stage. At this point, he or she is not inhibited and may act aggressively, emotionally, or impulsively. These behaviors can either be internalized (withdrawal) or externalized (yelling, hitting, biting, self-harm, destroying objects or property, and kicking). During the rage stage, it is important to prioritize the child’s safety, while paying close attention to the protection of the people and objects around them.

Recovery Stage

Recovery Stage of a child with Autism

After the meltdown has run its course, the child may not completely recall what actually happened during the rage stage. While some children may get exhausted to the point that they need to sleep, others may become withdrawn, morose, or deny the occurrence of inappropriate conduct. During the recovery stage, children may not always be ready to learn or willing to accept correction. As a result, it is important that parents and caregivers intervene and help at a time and manner in which the child can accept them. If not, the intervention may lead to resuming the meltdown cycle in an even more hostile and accelerated pattern.

It is highly unlikely that your child actively wants to engage in tantrums and meltdowns; the rage cycle might be the only way they express distress and cope with problems amid a plethora of overwhelming emotions. Hence, it is essential to encourage children with autism to gradually deal with their feelings in a healthier way and work on approaches that increase their social understanding and problem-solving skills.

And on that note, here are the top five strategies you can use to prevent tantrums, while effectively calming your child during meltdowns –

  1. Establish a Home Base – A home base can be defined as a quiet, isolated area (at home or school) with minimal visual activity or distractions where the child can go to escape from a stressful setting or event. The designated home base can also have access to activities that are carefully selected to be calming and soothing. Irrespective of the location, it is important that the child views the home base as a positive environment that he or she can turn to, before or during a meltdown.
  2. Build External Coping Skills – Tantrums and meltdowns can be caused by a lack of skills such as communication, problem-solving, and impulse control. Accordingly, it is essential to help your child develop coping skills such as negotiation, in addition to frequently practicing breathing exercises, having a calming routine, and scheduling ‘quiet’ times.
  3. Sensory Toolkit – Sensory tools can be of great help, especially in keeping your child occupied when they feel overwhelmed in a public setting. Your child’s sensory toolkit can include fidgety toys, chewy or crunchy snack items, hand wipes, scented hand lotion, sunglasses, and weighted blankets. However, remember not to force these things on your child when they are experiencing a meltdown.
  4. Empathize – Empathizing, instead of punishing or yelling, can do wonders. It is really important that your child knows that you’re listening and you understand their situation. Reassure your child that expressing their emotions is absolutely okay, and although the process can get overwhelming sometimes, their feelings are completely valid. 
  5. Reinforce Positive Behavior – Acknowledging your child’s emotions and praising them for good behavior is of utmost importance. For instance, you can verbally express how happy you are that your child kept the toys back in place after playtime or even give them a hug. These actions will help curb meltdowns and tantrums as your child gradually understands that you recognize his or her efforts and appreciate them.

Since every child with autism is different and has a distinct processing profile, it is challenging to design a one-size-fits-all solution to managing meltdowns. Ideally, parents find that reducing the amount of stress and anxiety in the child’s immediate environment can significantly help reduce the intensity and frequency of meltdowns. Typically termed as a ‘sensory diet,’ these everyday steps can be advantageous in managing as well as preventing autism meltdowns!

While these tips and strategies are helpful, your child may have unique needs that can be adequately addressed by contacting a reliable and professional autism care center, such as Early Autism Services (EAS).

So, go ahead and schedule a free consultation call with us right here.